Golf Presents – What Present To Get A Golfer

If you want to buy a golfer a present, then in this article I’m going to give you a few suggestions that will be helpful in doing that. If you buy a golfer the wrong golf present it could really disappoint them and be a waste of money. To help make sure that doesn’t happen, here are my top suggestions.

Golf Books:

If the golfer you are looking at buying a gift for is keen and wants to improve their game then you should look at getting them a golf book that promises improvement. There are copious amounts of golf books available. A good place to start the search for the perfect book is Amazon. Simply search golf under the books section and read the reviews to find a good golf improvement book.

Present for a lady golfer:

If the person you are buying for is a woman then you could give them a golf gift basket. In the gift basket you could included some golf balls, savory gourmet treats, golf tees, golf socks etc. A good golf ball to give a woman golfer is MC Lady Golf balls. These balls are designed for golfers who find the traditional balls too firm, and MC Lady Golf balls are great for providing optimal performance at lower club speeds.

Personalized Golf Gifts:

One Christmas I received some golf tees as a present. I was not very impressed, BUT when I looked more closely I saw that they had my name on them. That sure turned what I thought was a really bad present into a great one.

You can get many things personalized, and that can quickly turn what may be an average golf present into a great one. It’s amazing what simply putting a person’s name onto something can do for them.

Some ideas for this are:

Personalized ball markers

Personalized golf balls

Personalized tees

Personalized golf bags

So that’s some ideas for golf presents. Don’t underestimate how putting a name on something can turn a very low dollar value gift into a great gift!

Do Your Presentation Work With A Laser Pointer

It’s downright incredible how cheap laser pointers are these days. Lit up 30 years, ago the laser diode is the basis of all of the world’s cheap lasers. You can get a decent one on eBay for less than 10$. A laser pointer is very useful, and one of its most popular usages nowadays is wireless laser presenter.

At some point or another in everybody’s working life, a presentation in front of one’s peers, colleagues, or customers is inevitable. Laser presenter offers a very nice alternative to remaining tethered to a PC while cranking through the PowerPoint presentation. In fact, as the product name so ably illustrates, the wireless laser Presenter not only gives presenters the ability to walk away from the PC showing their slides, it lets them highlight key information items on their foils with an intense spot of bright light.

Most wireless laser presenter combines office help functions to simplify the process. Functions like advance or reverse the slide deck, scroll page up, down and more. There are two kinds of technology – FR and Bluetooth wireless technology both enables 10 meters effective range. To handle it, simply plug in the USB dongle to the PC, then pairing the laser presenter with dongle, OK well done. Due to high efficiency, though powered by two or more battery cells, it can last for days to use.

Green laser pointers are nothing special these days, either. People think green laser is more visible because humans eyes are somehow 10 times more sensitive to green light than red light. Even the green beam can be seen at some high power green lasers, and the dot is clearly visible on bright surface even sunlit surface. Choose a green laser will helps your audience easily catching the dot and thereby, your points in presentation.

OSRAM – The Five Components of an Effective Presentation – Part 1 of 5 – The Objective

How do you give an Effective Presentation? What makes the difference between an average presentation and an effective presentation? This is Part 1 of 5 in a series of articles.

There are five main components of an effective business presentation. The acronym OSRAM should help you to remember them and help you to light up your audience. The five components are:

  • The Objective
  • The Speaker
  • The Room
  • The Audience
  • The Message

You should consider each of these components in turn to maximize the effectiveness of your presentation. Neglecting any individual component can ruin an otherwise successful presentation. Put them together correctly and you will turn on a light in people’s heads; brighten up their lives; get your audience to see and understand things, about which they were previously in the dark.

This series of articles looks at each of these components in turn and discover what needs to be done to ensure the success of that component.

The Objective

What do you want the audience to do as a result of your presentation?

To create an effective presentation the first thing you need to decide is what the objective of the presentation is. Sounds simple, doesn’t it?

But there may be more to that simple statement than you first perceive. You could say that for a product presentation the objective is for the audience to learn about the product, but that would be a very poor objective, as there is no action associated with it and no way of measuring how successfully it has been accomplished. The question you should ask yourself is ‘Okay, after my presentation they will know more about our product, but what do I want them to do next?’.

If your answer is ‘I want them to buy it’ then maybe you have gone to the other extreme. This objective may be fine if you work on a market stall and sell a vegetable chopper that cuts, slices and dices everything from tomatoes to pineapples. In that case, it may be realistic that after you have presented how easy it is to use and what a lovely job it makes, some people will want to buy one. For a market stall presentation, “selling the product” is a very good and plausible objective, which is measured by the thickness of your wallet at the end of the day.

However, for most business-to-business sales, it is unlikely that the presentation will lead directly to the sale. The sale may happen months later by which time you will have forgotten how well the presentation went.

So what is your objective? And how can you measure your success? The best objectives are SMART objectives.

SMART stands for:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Attainable
  • Relevant
  • Timely

In the above examples objectives “getting the audience to know more about my products” is not easily measurable or very specific, and buying the product is not very timely.

A reasonable objective, when the presentation is the first real contact that members of the audience have had with your company, may be for 40% to arrange follow up meetings with your sales force.

When you are presenting at a conference on a subject, in which your company specializes, you may measure the success by the number of people who come up to talk to you after you have finished. You can set yourself a target of say 10 people. If only two people want to talk to you afterward, then it may be because your presentation did not stir up enough interest. If over 20 people come to talk you, you will have exceeded your expectations.

As every presentation has an objective it is important that the presentation concludes with a call to action that informs, encourages and directs people to meet your objective. If you want them to arrange a meeting with your sales force, you need to tell them to arrange that meeting and make it as easy as possible for them to do it. Consider having the sales force join you after the presentation so they can talk to their prospective clients, there and then.

With an objective of having people to talk with you after a conference presentation, you need to tell the audience where you will be and that you would welcome the opportunity to discuss any aspect of the subject in more depth, on an individual basis, or answer any more specific questions that your presentation has raised in their minds.

As you can see, by objective, what I am really talking about is what action you want the delegates to take following the presentation.

Of course, yours is not the only objective you need to consider. What are the audience’s objectives likely to be? What do they want to get from your presentation? Understanding your audience and their objectives is the key to an effective presentation and is discussed in the section entitled ‘The Audience’.

Your OSRAM objective should be SMART and remember to use a call to action at the end of you presentation to reinforce your objective.