Personalised Presents As Wedding Anniversary Gifts

When you go through your options when it comes to wedding anniversary gifts have you taken personalised presents into consideration? Something as special as a marriage deserves special presents. There are no other more special presents than personalised presents because you but your own personal stamp on it by adding exactly what you want on it. May it be wedding photos, honeymoon photos, images special to the married couple or text – one thing is for sure and that us that these personalised presents make ideal wedding anniversary gifts.

If you are buying wedding anniversary gifts for your spouse there are some great personalised presents to choose from. Designer bedding items are probably the most ideal to give your husband or wife as you share your bed together. A personalised duvet cover, pillow cases, bed sheet and photo blanket make a brilliant wedding anniversary gifts set for you and your other half on your anniversary. Make these personalised presents match or use all different images for each item.

Other fantastic wedding anniversary gifts for your loved one is wall art. As a married couple you share your home together so why not add some new interesting wall art pieces to the home interior? Canvas prints, photo wallpaper and photo poster prints can all feature wedding photos or perhaps a more recent photo of the two of you. The canvas prints can be made in different colours, sizes and treatments so you really have a great opportunity here to create both stunning personalised presents as well as interior pieces which the two of you can enjoy a lifetime. Why not turn a wedding photo into a Banksy canvas? Or perhaps a portrait of the two of you into a cartoon-style custom portrait? Anything that celebrates your love will make superb personalised presents.

If you are looking for wedding anniversary gifts for a couple you know, could be your parents or some friends of yours, you could go for matching bags. The make up bag for her and the wash bag for him make an ideal personalised bag gift set for a couple celebrating their wedding anniversary. Use a photo of the groom for her make up bag and a photo of the bride for his wash bag. Wedding anniversary gifts have never looked so elegant or personal as when you use your very own photos for personalised presents. Start personalising for the married couple today!

Top 5 Ways to Not Present Yourself As a Serious Student

I would like to present the Top 5 Things NOT To Present Yourself As A Serious Student. And to be crystal clear, serious students are those who are interested in graduate school (and more than likely, beat the competition to get in).

1. “Is this gonna be on the test?”
*Heavy sigh* Not only am I not reviewing information just for my health, but oftentimes lessons learned in class are bigger than students realize. Assignments that build in critical thinking questions? These are great preparation for the skills needed in graduate school. Little do students realize, grad school is heavily reliant upon critical thinking skills.

2. “I missed class yesterday. Did we discuss anything important?”
Great way to notify me of your absence from class. And regardless of how it was intended, it is a little off-putting to ask your instructor if anything important was covered in class. Aren’t all classes supposed to cover important material? Otherwise, why are we here in the first place? (And yes, I have actually had a student ask me this question.)

Honorary mention goes to: “I missed class. Can you give me the notes?” It is probably a much better idea to ask one of your classmates for notes than the actual T.A. or professor. Again, off-putting. And a sign that you are not taking this class seriously.

3. “I’m only taking this class because it’s required.”
You know…. As a student, it is your absolute right to proclaim that (1) you’re not interested in my class or (2) you’re only paying attention as little as possible to pass the test. That’s fine. However, it is also my right to decline to lend support should you ever ask for a letter of recommendation.

4. “I know I missed ___ classes, but I need ___ points to make a ___.”
My response? “Wow. That’s interesting. I hope you are not implying that I’m supposed to give away freebie points to bump you up to the next grade.” I once had a student state that he realized there was a strict attendance policy, and despite the fact that he missed nine classes, he felt like he deserved an A. You have really got to be kidding. Ditto to the student who admitted that he failed to attend any of the Thursday lectures for his Tuesday/Thursday class (and wanted to know why he was failing tests).

And last, but not least:

5. Texting, Twitter-ing, or Facebook-ing your way through class.
I love social media as much as the next person. However, there is a time and a place to keep in touch with friends — and classtime is neither. Some people think that large lecture-style classes buys anonymity, and while your T.A. or Professor may not say anything to you, trust, they are definitely taking mental notes.

Now let’s talk about how serious students tend to comport themselves in the classroom. First, they’re very aware that the T.A. may be their main point of reference for judging their ability to do well in graduate school. This is especially the case if you attend a large university where the norm is the 1000 seat lecture hall. It is an absolute great idea to take your classes seriously, communicate interest in the particular subject area (or related areas, like asking the Social Psychology professor how to get involved in Cognitive Psychology), or ask your T.A. for advice on applying to grad school. Remember, your T.A. is very likely the person who will be signing off on letters of recommendation (or even if not, the professor is likely to ask his/her opinion about your ability to do well in grad school). Do your best to impress!

Fear of Speaking – Public Presentation Anxiety? Panic No More!

Is it really possible to overcome the fear of speaking, public presentation anxiety and learn to panic no more when in front of an audience?

Let’s admit it: Most of us dread the thought of speaking before others. Some people have even ranked their fear of speaking, public presentation anxiety and the very thought of being in front of others above their fear of death! However you might feel about it yourself, there are good reasons why you should be interested in public speaking.

It is pretty safe to say that public speaking is a skill that everyone needs. Yes, sooner or later, you may have to face an audience. You may be called on to teach a class of co-workers, pitch a proposal to a client, or explain a financial report to managers.

Actually, speaking skills are essential in a wide range of jobs, including journalism, management, public relations, sales and marketing.

What, though, if your fear of speaking, public presentations etc is so intense and relentless, that you choose your career so that you can eliminate all the chances of you having to step in front of an audience? Well, what about a job interview? Being able to speak well on a job interview may mean the difference between getting hired or not. On the job itself, your ability to express yourself can work in your favour. It may even mean a better job, higher pay, or at least more respect.

Learning good speaking skills can thus benefit you in a variety of ways. Even so, you may still feel anxious at the thought of getting up before an audience. Is there something you can do to overcome your anxiety? Yes, there is.

Tips for anxiety free public speaking:

Don’t be brilliant:

You don’t have to be brilliant or perfect to succeed! The essence of public speaking is this: give your audience something of value. In other words, concentrate on the message, not on yourself or your own anxieties.

Talk, don’t perform:

Your speech should not be a performance. Rather, it should be a conversation. The more conversational your approach, the more relaxed you will be. Try to connect with your audience, not as a mass, but as individuals. Show a real “personal interest” in your audience, and speak the way you normally talk. The way to do this is not to speak to the audience! Instead; talk some time to a single person in the audience. Choose someone who looks friendly. Then, turn to another person and tell another thought to this person.

They don’t want you to fail:

A common reason for anxiety is fear of embarrassment or of being judged by your audience. Luckily the fact is that audiences tend to want you to succeed, not fail! They are on your side!

Nervousness is not all bad:

Contrary to popular belief nervousness is good for you and your presentation. Why is that? Because a measure of nervousness reflects modesty, which will help keep you from becoming overconfident. Many feel that a little nervous energy actually makes them perform better.

Talk, don’t read:

Use outline instead of written talk. That way it’s easier to maintain eye contact, and we speak more naturally and sound more conversational when we use an outline instead of writing things out word for word.

Be human:

Don’t be afraid to laugh at yourself. Everyone makes mistakes. You just have to try your best and if, or rather when, the mistake happens -take it easy; it can even work for your benefit: audience likes you even more after you have shown this human side and made that mistake. For sure a mistake or two does not make you less likable.

Practise man practise:

Of course, there is no substitute for experience and lots of practice. Prepare your speech far enough in advance so that you have enough time to practice. Talk it to someone. Not just to yourself, but to a friend, spouse, and a colleague.

Apply these skills. At least try them, and you will see that you can beat that fear of speaking, public presentation anxiety and possibly any social anxiety. And you will panic no more!